Thursday, 7 September 2017

Two more clues for Terry as Anohito

This painful scene has now lit a new understanding for me
(Chapter 7, art by Igarashi Yumiko, story by Mizuki Kyoko)


Recently, a combined effort between me and Nila has led us to find two more clues for Terry as Anohito. They are from Vol 2 pp 196 and 237. I think the clue at p 237 is more glaring and impactful, but nonetheless, the clue at p 196 is also interesting. The justifications are as follows, thanks to Nila for the original scripts and Kanji assistance. Tanoshikatta ne!


Anohito laughing at Candy’s mistake

Nila asked me to check the translation Candy's retrospection in Vol 2, p. 196. This is when Candy was thinking about Dr. Leonard (at the St Joseph’s Hospital in Chicago). Candy thought Dr. Leonard as a ruthless person, but later she realised that he was just being a professional doctor, thus he reprimanded Candy for treating Albert without an authorization. Later, when he became the director, Dr. Leonard abolished Room #0 in the hospital, effectively stating that all patients must be treated equally. In this monologue, Candy was saying this (last line of p. 196):



ひとは外見で判断してはいけない、とさんざん学んできたはずなのに、わたしときたら、未だに見誤ることばかりで、あのひとに笑われている。

hito wa gaiken de handanshite haikenai, to sanzanmanandekita hazunanoni,  watashi to kitara, imada ni miayamaru koto bakaride , ano hito ni warawareteiru .

 A person should not be judged based on his/her outward appearance; I have learned as much from experience many times. Yet, when I keep repeating the same mistake, that person just laughs at me.


Please note that 笑われている (warawareteiru) denotes present time (present tense – “te-iru”), hence I use the present tense in the second part of the sentence.

It also means that the Anohito in Candy’s retrospection here was her husband, because she was speaking in the present tense (back in the late 1930s).

Now, I am aware that the next part of the passage would create an impression that Albert was the Anohito Candy referred to in p. 196.

Vol 2, p 197 (first lines):

アルバートさん---.
当時の わたしはアルバートさんフルネームさえらなかった.
アルバートさんアルバートさんなのだ, となんのかなかった.
アルバートさんが, 存在しているだけで思議包まれた.
今ならその見えない糸につながれた絆の意味がわかろ.

arubāto san ---.
tōji no watashi wa arubāto san furunēmu sae shiranakatta.
arubāto san wa arubāto sanna noda , to nan no gimon moidakanakatta .
arubāto san ga , sonzai shiteiru dake de fushiginaanshinkan ni tsutsumareta .
imanara sono mienai ito ni tsunagareta kizuna no imi gawakaro .

Mr. Albert…
At that time, I didn’t even know Mr. Albert’s full name.
I didn’t have any problem to accept that Mr Albert was Mr Albert.
Albert-san’s existence wrapped me in a strange sense of security.
Only now, I understand the meaning of the invisible ties that bind us.



However, linking Albert with Anohito just because he was written directly after the Anohito sentence is incorrect for a very obvious reason: in her monologue in the present moment, Candy addressed Albert as “Albert-san” or “Mr Albert”. Unless Candy’s present time was in the Edo, Regency, Victorian or Edwardian period (or any period beforehand), she would not have addressed her husband as Albert-san. She would address him as just “Albert” or “Bert”. In fact, had it been during the Regency period, she'd address her husband as "Mr Ardlay" instead of "Mr Albert". Regarding the "invisible ties" (mienai ito), it doesn't always refers to lovers. There are ties that bind between close friends, sisters, siblings, a mother and a son, etc., so that phrase does not necessarily convey romance (I will make another post about Albert-Candy dynamics one day).

Moreover, Candy then immediately talked about the letters from Terry in the passage afterwards.

テリィからの手紙そして, り抜き­­––– いい評判むのがつらくなるような.
評判もみんなテリィなのだ,としまってある.

Terry kara no tegami no taba. Soshite, kōen no kirinuki ––– ī hyōban mo yomu no ga tsuraku naru yōna .
hyōban mo minna Terry na noda, to shimattearu.

A bundle of letters from Terry. Also, clippings of his public performances –– all the good reviews and critics that are heart-breaking to read, all are Terry’s and I put them back.  


The passages in Vol 2 pp 196-197 can be confusing if the sentences are not analysed properly
because a passage about Albert (first lines of p 197) directly follows
the passage about Anohito laughing (last line of p 196)


Thus, I think we should not link the passage where Anohito laughed at Candy’s mistake (of misjudging a person based on appearance) with the following passages about Albert or Terry. The passage of Anohito in the last line of p. 196 is a stand-alone passage. Afterwards, Candy could have been talking about Dr Martin, and it’s also valid that she suddenly talked about Dr Martin (or Sister Lane, or even Eliza). It was her monologue, her mind jumped from one memory to another.

Thus, we should analyse the sentence about Anohito laughing at Candy’s mistake as an independent entity in this passage. Thus, we return to this stand-alone passage:

ひとは外見で判断してはいけない、とさんざん学んできたはずなのに、わたしときたら、未だに見誤ることばかりで、あのひとに笑われている。

hito wa gaiken de handanshite haikenai , to sanzanmanandekita hazunanoni,  watashi to kitara, imada ni miayamaru koto bakaride , ano hito ni warawareteiru .

 A person should not be judged based on his/her outward appearance; I have learned as much from experience many times. Yet, when I keep repeating the same mistake, that person just laughs at me.


This Anohito seems to have a knack of laughing at Candy’s mistakes, for he found them humorous. I recall that Albert was chuckling when Candy failed to make dinner in manga Chapter 9, but he was not laughing (warau). I give it that Albert is more calm and collected than Terry; although Albert would find Candy’s mistake funny, he’d chuckle at that instead of laughing at that. 


Albert chuckling at Candy's antics, Chapter 9


Albert winking at Candy's blunder, Chapter 9


On the other hand, in Chapter 4, Terry laughed out loud when Candy told him that she called Sister Grey “an old hag” (although Terry became subdued afterwards when Candy told him that she was banned from the May Festival).


Chapter 4

Terry also laughed at the blushing Candy after he rescued her from the near-fall from a tree they climbed in Scotland.

Chapter 4
Still pulling her legs... (Chapter 4)


Thus, based on the habits of Terry and Albert, I conclude that the Anohito in the last line of p. 196 is Terry.



The heat of Terry’s chest (Vol 2, p 237)

This clue is a very prominent clue that Nila and I almost jumped up and down when we realised it. To think that it has been sitting there for almost 7 years for us to find…

From Vol 2 p 237 when Candy was reminiscing the painful separation in New York. She recalled how Terry’s voice was during the separation as he hugged her from behind:

–––もう少し……このままで……。テリィの声。わたしの大好きな深みのあるテリィの声」

“mōsukoshi…… konomama de……”. Teryi no koe. Watashi no daisukina fukami no aru Terry no koe

“A bit longer… just like this…” Terry’s voice. Terry’s deep voice that I love the most.  


Chapter 7



Candy also remembered how Terry’s cold tears dropped onto her neck. She then recalled how:

わたしをきしのたテリィのさは今もわたしのしく脈っている.

watashi o idakishi no ta terī no mune no atsu sa wa ima mo watashi no naka de hageshiku myakūtteiru.

The heat of Terry’s chest that embraced me is still pulsing violently within me.


The most important part of that sentence is the use of 今も (ima mo, “now also”) and “te-iru” in the っている (myakūtteiru). Those words denote present tense. Thus, the last sentence on this passage definitely indicates Candy’s present state in her monologue. 


It means that the heat of Terry’s chest IS indeed still pulsing wildly within Candy during her recollections. If Anohito is Albert, Candy wouldn’t smile to Anthony in her dreams, saying that she is living with the man she loves (in this case, Albert), yet she still feels Terry’s warm chest leaping violently inside her in her present moment. That is not Candy. Candy was a girl who lived a life of integrity, of authenticity. She would not marry Albert if she still had emotions for Terry pulsating wildly inside her heart. There’s no way that this Anohito is Albert then. 

Thus, although there is no “Anohito” in this passage, the last sentence on this section definitely indicates that Terry is Anohito.



Thus, so far we have collected 14 cases in Candy’s monologue where 11 of them are definite clues for Terry, while 3 of them are applicable for both Terry and Albert (no clues attributable to only Albert). Without even pulling out a statistic test, one could see that the indications for Terry overwhelms indications for Terry or Albert. Thus (feel like a broken LP now...): Terry is Anohito ^_^


But what if we plug the numbers into a statistical test?

To be continued in the next post…

2 comments:

Anneth White said...

Hi dear Icha, I totally agree with you and Nila, also i want to tell you that all the girls that are following the Spanish translation in wattpad reached the same conclusión afer Reading that episode. In the italian edition of the novel that paragraph where Candy talks in present about her husband laughing about her repeated mistake is separated from the rest of the text after and before, so the translator made a very good job showing the difference in times of the retrospection and the present.

Also we know terry is the one that changes of mood so suddenly and likes to laugh with candy´s mistakes or wants to make Candy believes she is wrong. Remember how he laughed when she met him in the ship and she realised he was crying....

About Candy feeling in her heart still the deep sorrow for having to leave Terry at the hospital so many years before is the confirmation her love is still there in Avon, and adult woman that loves so much Terry still... and the answer is she can express that feeling still because he is her husband. Otherwise there won´t be any comment about that "past love" if she is HAPPY WITH ANOTHER MAN, or she will be telling lies!!! and whe know Candy is a correct, sincere, sensitive women!!!

Hugs for both of you ladys!!! i am so glad to know Nila is finding also with you several new confirmed clues!!!!

Icha said...

Hi dear Anneth!

"In the italian edition of the novel that paragraph where Candy talks in present about her husband laughing about her repeated mistake is separated from the rest of the text after and before, so the translator made a very good job showing the difference in times of the retrospection and the present."

Oooh, how nice! I have the Italian editions now, so I will check that passage later.

"the answer is she can express that feeling still because he is her husband."

True... true...

Thanks a lot for the comment again and also for the new info about the Italian edition!

Also, I'm now somewhat happy that we don't have the English translation yet, for we might end up with a bad translation that does not heed the nuances in the Kanji characters and grammatical forms that Nagita used in the novel... By studying the JP novel ourselves, we know now what happens, hence we can better inform ourselves if an English translation is ever published!